“Russian Paranoia” Debunked

If you have been following the Western media line on Russia lately, you might believe that not only is the Kremlin plotting continental conquest, but that Russian policy is driven by a dark, irrational “paranoia” centuries in the making.

There’s a second round of the Cold War in production, and we’re all supposed to buy into the scare story that Vladimir Putin and his fellow KGB veterans have pounced on a courageous but hapless Ukraine yearning only for freedom, French fries, democracy and Disneyland. (Never mind that the US State Department openly installed the current regime in Kiev by way of a liberal-nationalist coup in February 2014.) Moreover, Putin was labelled a power-mad dictator for protecting the Russian-majority Crimea and facilitating its reunion with Russia by referendum this spring. In the following months, NATO furiously hyped Novorussia’s rebel movement as the prelude to an invasion that never materialized. What, then, is the real context behind Russian “aggression” and “paranoia?”

Washington would never dream of a naval base in Crimea. That's just paranoid!

Washington would never dream of a naval base in Crimea. That’s just paranoid!

Seemingly so obvious as to be overlooked, the historical record provides prime insights as to why Moscow would be so distrustful of Western strategic designs. Geopolitical directives from the 160-year-old Crimean War (control of the Black Sea/Caucasus and access to the Eastern Mediterranean) remain roughly the same as today, a fact duly noted when Russian paratroopers and GRU spetsnaz units secured Sevastopol in March. Every hundred years or so for the whole modern era, a major Western power has seized upon the utterly crazy idea of attacking and conquering Russia. So let’s take a stroll down memory lane, century by century:

  1. 17th Century – Poland: In the early seventeenth century, the mighty Rzeczpospolita of King Sigismund III exploited Muscovite Russia’s Time of Troubles and went so far as to occupy the cathedrals of the Kremlin until finally being expelled in 1612. Few of us have ever heard of the massacres and persecutions inflicted upon the Russian lands by the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, but the Russians themselves remember all too well.
  2. 18th Century – Sweden: While now submerged in decadence, early eighteenth-century Sweden was the superpower of its day. Led by the swashbuckling Charles XII, the Swedes fought for dominance over the Baltic against Peter the Great and his men, who through a brutal and close-fought contest won Russia’s “window” to Europe.
  3. 19th Century – France: In 1812 warlord extraordinaire Napoleon Bonaparte took the Grande Armée all the way to Moscow, expecting submission from a vanquished populace. Instead, Russian forces under Marshal Kutuzov would chase the Little Corporal all the way back to Paris.
  4. 20th Century – Germany: The twentieth century, the age of total war, saw Germany invade Russia twice in massive campaigns of unparalleled ferocity. Hitler’s Operation Barbarossa remains the largest-scale military action ever undertaken, one that cost 20 million Russian lives before Soviet soldiers ascended the Reichstag amidst the ruins of Berlin in May 1945.
  5. 21st Century – USA/NATO: The Cold War policy of “containment” never ended – the United States and the NATO alliance it controls are actively pursuing a policy of destabilization along Russia’s periphery with an eye to dominating Eurasia and its hydrocarbon riches. Western oligarchic elites dream of somehow eliminating Russian-led resistance to their New World Order; thus, CIA-engineered color revolutions, covert wars using jihadist proxies and humanitarian bombing from the Balkans to the Hindu Kush are all par for the course.

Upon assuming responsibilities as the new Secretary-General of NATO, Atlanticist functionary Jens Stoltenberg declared that the alliance would continue projecting power “wherever it wants.” The Russians, doubtless, will beg to differ, as they are the inheritors of a strategic culture shaped by successive wars for national survival. Even if you are paranoid, someone out there still might be gunning for you.

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5 thoughts on ““Russian Paranoia” Debunked

  1. What could have been! A zone of peace around the entire northern hemisphere of the world, but the madmen running US foreign policy will not accept peace unless they totally dominate.

    My only remaining hope is that the East will coalesce into a sufficiently strong force to draw a line that the West will dare not cross. Until then I expect the US to cause more war and chaos, and immensely more suffering.

  2. …..ON EVERY FACE OPENING EYES WILL SEE,..THAT YET ANOTHER AGE HAS PASSED.
    WE ALL MUST LOOK AWAY, FROM THE WAY WE ARE TODAY..WE MUST LOOK AWAY. (Heaven 17)

    JUST WAIT;
    EVERYONE WILL EVENTUALLY CATCH ON TO THE NEW ORDER – THE REAL ONE THAT IS!!!
    [SOME ARE JUST A BIT SLOWER THAN OTHERS – IT’S NO BIG DEAL]
    : FROM THE HEART SPRINGS LIBERATION, FROM THE MIND TRUE REVELATION!!

  3. In addition the Anglo-French campaign against Tsarist Russia which culminated in Crimean War. British naval power grew after the Napoleonic Wars and London attempted global hegemony. United States remained beyond control as did Russia. United Kingdom used Ottoman Empire to challenge Russia was was expanding into Balkans. France and U.K even attempted to attack Russia via Siberia.

    What was surprising is how Russia came to join the Triple Entente

    • You are right about it being surprising. The answer is found in the excellent book by authors Docherty & Macgregor, Hidden History (2013) – the british controlled key individuals in all wanted allied countries.

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